Friday, November 20, 2009

Billy Batson/Captain Marvel appearing in Brave & Bold cartoon!

Back in July at Comic-Con in San Diego, it was announced that Captain Marvel/Billy Batson and the Marvel Family would appear with Batman in the "Brave and the Bold" cartoon. Well, the first clip is available on IGN and it's a doozy!



Tara Strong does the voice of Billy, and Jeff Bennett does the voice of the Big Red Cheese. I can't wait to see how they will do Mary and Freddy!

Thursday, November 19, 2009

Monster Society re-print delayed

Many classic Captain Marvel fans have been very excited since it was announced that the Fawcett serial "The Monster Society of Evil" was going to be reprinted in a single volume again, this time affordable priced (there was a deluxe hardcover edithion with a slipcase published back in the early 1990's, but it was a very expensive item).

Sadly, though, it seems that the release date for this has been delayed. perhaps it is to coincide with some anticipated news about the "Shazam" movie project?

http://www.comiclist.com/index.php/news/orders-cancelled-for-shazam-the-monster-society-of-evil-hc

Friday, November 6, 2009

New Video: Lecture on the DC-Fawcett Lawsuit

This was edited together from the Captain Marvel Culture lecture I did at I-Con in March:

Monday, November 2, 2009

Marvel (Miracle) Man to be reprinted!

Yes, I am a little behind on this news. Marvel comics acquired the rights to Marvelman (known in the US as Miracleman because of Marvel Comics' claim to the trademark of "Marvel"), the 1950' British follow-up to the original Captain Marvel created by Mick Anglo. Now they have announced that they will be reprinting the 1980's series written first by Alan Moore and continued by Niel Gaiman.

This was a remarkably well written and drawn series that broke new ground for comics and explored the ramifications of super-powers further than any comic book had sone up to that time. Peter Sanderson has lectured that the Marvelman/Miracleman series is one of the most important in comic book history because it kicked off the post-modern movement of 1986, which in his words, is "the Year the Changed Comics."

You can read the post by Graeme McMillan on 109.com here (the comments section, however, turns into a big argument about whether or not Alan More is an asshole for what he is quoted in the post as saying about this).